Typology

Typology

ARNAU, R.C., ROSEN, D.H., & THOMPSON, B. (2000)
Article: RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY SCORES FROM THE SINGER-LOOMIS TYPE DEPLOYMENT INVENTORY. The Journal of Analytical Psychology, 45: 409-426.
Institution:Professor at Texas A&M University
Address:Psycholoyg Building TAMU College Station, TX 77843-4235
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GIANNINI, JOHN (2004)
Book: COMPASS OF THE SOUL TYPOLOGY'S FOUR COUPLINGS AS ARCHETYPAL DIRECTIONS FOR A FULLER LIFE.
Abstract: The goal of this book, besides the main one of developing the archetypal makeup of the couplings and the auxiliary one of pointing out the many reasons we have a divided Jungian family in the world, the analysts and the typologists, it have also sought to show the archetypal nature of all the types which Jung often gave intimations of but never developed systematically. Jung has not written about the larger implications of his typology system and he did not focus on the couplings. As a result, typology has been left outside of the main Jungian stream. Jung tended to talk and write of archetypes primarily in terms of images and of types in his Chapter Ten of Types as primarily in terms of traits. Yet symbols are also described as traits, including type traits. Traits are just as archetypal as images. Jung did not make this clear. Yet most of his book, Chapters One through Nine, described types also in terms of images, ie, his discussion of Prometheus as introvert and Epimetheus as extrovert (Chapter Five) But most persons who were interested in typology turned to his chapter Ten, picked out its "classifying' traits approach and ignored his symbolically loaded first 9 chapters. In a letter found in Jung Letters, Vol 2, pp. 550-552), Jung bewails "the classifying application" as "the first and almost -exclusive way in which my book was understood". Jung then argues that his types are more than trait classifications of individuals but have to do "with principals and content" that "are in themselves immensely complicated structures." But even here he does not call the types archetypes. They're only implied. This book, Compass of the Soul Typology's Four Couplings as Archetypal Directions for a Fuller Life attempts to fill this gap.
Institution: Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts
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